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Sleep Paralysis: Night-mares, Nocebos, and the Mind-Body Connection

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For other uses of the word Succubus, see Succubus (disambiguation).

For other uses of the word Incubus, see Incubus (disambiguation).

For other uses of the word Lilith, see Lilith (disambiguation).


Sleep Paralysis: Night-mares, Nocebos, and the Mind-Body Connection Book Cover. Written by Shelley R. Adler.

Sleep Paralysis: Night-mares, Nocebos, and the Mind-Body Connection is book of research on sleep paralysis written by Shelley R. Adler. The author is a professor in the department of family and community medicine and director of education at the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. This particular work examines the idea of sleep paralysis as a studies in Medical Anthropology. Part of the work is concerned with discussing the concepts of Lilith, Incubi and Succubi, as they relate to the explanation of sleep paralysis posed in the past. The author delves into how the myth of the existence of Lilith and her children were used to explain the terrors that some experienced during sleep.


Overview

  • Title: Sleep Paralysis: Night-mares, Nocebos, and the Mind-Body Connection
  • Author: Shelley R. Adler
  • Published By: Rutgers University Press
  • Length: 192 Pages
  • Format: Paperback
  • ISBN-10: 0813548861
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813548869
  • Publishing Date: November 10, 2010


Plot Summary

Sleep Paralysis explores a form of nocturnal fright: the "night-mare", or incubus. In its original meaning a night-mare was the nocturnal visit of an evil being that threatened to press the life out of its victim. Today, it is known as sleep paralysis-a state of consciousness between sleep and wakefulness, when you are unable to move or speak and may experience vivid and often frightening hallucinations. Culture, history, and biology intersect to produce this terrifying sleep phenomenon that is rarely recognized or understood in the contemporary United States.


Book Review

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