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Never Need To Be

A story with a bit of a hidden meaning, or perhaps that meaning will be one that really isn’t so hidden for those that know. Sometimes there are things that need to be said, but then they can also be the things that …

 

Never Need To Be
By TeraS

 

There are moments when Tera can be indecisive. They are rare, and most would never notice them when they happen. Still, they do, and she is quite aware of them within her own thoughts.

The problem on this particular day wasn’t one where the universe hung on her next choice. No, it was a very simple question that, normally, might have a simple answer. However, nothing for Tera ever really was simple, even if the outcome only was a result of her believing that point. This day mattered very much to her … to her dear friends on the other side of the fence, the koi pond marking the edges of where their worlds met … to her and her Eternal, for reasons that never really could be put into words, but then never really needed to be.

She had spent a very long time thinking.

Trinkets and gifts weren’t right. They didn’t express her love. Recalling a certain decorative plate she had given before, she smiled at what her Eternal had told her about that moment, the gasp of surprise, the look of amazement.

A card, no matter how lovely the words, couldn’t say what needed to. Oh, she had sent many cards in the past, but she knew just how awful her handwriting was—more so when she kept having to stop, wipe away tears and then continue writing. The thought did make that smile turn bemused. A queen with terrible handwriting: such an impossible thing, of course … but Tera was never an ordinary queen.

Flowers? Well, she had given them before, a particularly lovely rose bush once. Looking out her kitchen window, Tera could just make it out over the fence, the red blooms and green leaves just beginning to sprout, marking the arrival of spring where they resided now. Those thoughts made her smile become a thoughtful one.

She looked towards the home across the way, her fingernails tapping a beat upon the countertop in rhythm with her considerations for some time. Finally she made up her mind and turned away from the window.

A short time later, or not so short—time was an illusion, after all—a woman with ebon hair wearing a red sweater and blue jeans, made her way along a certain sidewalk towards a certain home in the garden of which a certain rose bush grew. Her heels clicked lightly upon the cobblestone walk, a moment later and she knocked lightly upon the door. She wondered if she looked right, if she had managed to look right, to simply be herself in the ways that matter most. After a time her thoughts had come to wondering if they were home when she heard the turning of a doorknob.

The door opened, a soul she knew through their love shone brightly there. A smile greeted her: “Hello.”

Tera smiled: “Hi.” For the first time in ages, the Queen of the Succubi fidgeted before she continued, while the lady in the doorway waited patiently: “I was trying to figure out something today.”

There was a moment … it wasn’t really an awkward one, more of a sudden realization of who
the guest was, and the surprise that she was standing on the doorstep.

She tugged at her hair: “I’ve sent flowers, cards, gifts before. I couldn’t figure out what would be right. There didn’t seem to be anything that really said the right thing, in the right way.” She shrugged slightly: “So that leaves … me. I just wanted to say … Happy birthday.”

The answer was a hug as Tera was pulled into a warm embrace, crying softly in the moment for all this meant to her. For the longest time, there were no words said; there really didn’t need to be any. But then the moment passed, the lady insisting that Tera come in, tears and all, for she was being silly.

Hours passed, the two talking, tea being shared, the occasional bit of laughter drifting from the porch where they rested together, looking out over the garden, where the rose bush was starting to bloom. The visiting queen was tracing a fingertip over the rim of her cup when she admitted something to her hostess during a pause in their time together: “I don’t say the words enough … what you mean to us. I know I need to say them.”

Her neighbor answered: “There never needs to be.”

It is a simple truth, one that transcends all else. The love of a family shared never needs to be explained, never needs to be said. When one knows, one simply does.

And so the words never need to be said, for they live within the souls of those we touch and love.

The words never need to be said, but, on that birthday, on that doorstep, in smiles and hugs, they were. And Tera went home quite sure it was she who received the gift.