Oct 06 2015

A Review of From Spark To Flame by Vicky Payne

From Spark To Flame by Vicky Payne

From Spark To Flame by Vicky Payne

A review of the first work in the Incubus Dreaming series by Vicky Payne today on the Tale. It is a story about an Incubus, a human, and the odd things that happen when one cannot believe in oneself… on both sides.

There are the things we see within ourselves that define who we are. If not to the world around us, then within ourselves. They speak of our insecurities, needs, hopes, wants and, if we allow it, our desires.

It is these things that shape who we are, not necessarily what we are. The two can be very different things if we are not capable of accepting all that we are.

Sometimes it takes shaking the foundations to be able to see there might be something more within ourselves if we are willing to try. It is the trying that is, after all, the most trying of times…

This work tells the story of:

After a disastrous relationship with a con artist leaves her up to her ears in debt and doubting that love exists, curvy Abigail Crane moves to a coastal town to start over. When the reclusive Billionaire Caledon Ambrose appears at the architecture firm where she works, she’s shocked by just how attracted she is to the masculine, alpha male that he is. Still, she tries to ignore her silly crush on the utterly unobtainable guy, until she begins to have sizzling, electric wet dreams about him. There’s something more than natural about Cale, and she’s not sure if she wants to find out what. Abby moved to the coat to escape her past, but she never really believed she’d find her future…

Caledon Ambrose is over eight hundred years old, and jaded in every possible way. A half-incubus, he’s had plenty of time to earn himself riches, to experience every kind of sordid, depraved pleasure available to mankind, and come to the conclusion that he will spend his immortality alone. But a vision of a woman he’s never seen taunts him, and when he discovers that she’s the secretary of his architect, he’s more than shocked. Unwilling to admit the power a mere mortal has over him, Cale tries to convince himself she’s nothing more than a mousy, shy creature. But there’s something about Abby, and his mind reaches to hers and enmeshes them both in delicious, sensual dreams he cannot control. Will he be able to burn out his desire for her by experiencing these bondage fantasies with her? Or will they both spiral down into a whirlpool of passion that threatens to disrupt every facet of his existence?

Abby is firing her way back out of a terrible situation on her own. It isn’t just the things that happened to ruin her life, but more it was the words spoken that turned out not to be true that have done the most damage. Cale appears, there is a literal spark, and Abby’s dreams change. For that matter so do Cale’s as well. But it is Cale’s secrets that bind them both, even if neither can see the bindings themselves.

There’s quite a lot of world building in this work which is mixed nicely with some hot little flashes of erotica between the two main characters. As the story unfolds, the thoughts of both Cale and Abby become real in a lot of ways. By that I mean the characters have depth, purpose, and meaning in their own ways. It isn’t simply a matter of telling a rote story, aiming to push the two characters together. There’s a struggle, some moments where they clash, try to understand what is happening, and I liked that because it made for character development that I enjoyed.

Abby’s background is as detailed as Cale’s and it told a story that I think set out the rest of the book well, explained why she acted the way she did, and much of her own being. I enjoyed the fact her real emotions came out in the work, that she didn’t act the same in every single moment she appeared. More interesting was how her dreamself and her real self differed as much as they did, which actually brought me to wonder about exactly who Abby is. There’s a little bit of mystery around her, some of which Cale comments on, and if I am correct in my thinking, I think that’s the more interesting story to tell.

Cale himself is a part-incubus, and as such he doesn’t act as the stereotypical incubus might in a story like this. There is a moment when his true form appears, wings, horns and… hooves. While I don’t care for the hooves, the mental image is unique in its own way and that was nice to see. But he is very single-minded at times, tending to force away a lot of things that, given a clear frame of mind, he should realize means something to him. But there’s more “refusing” of his being in this work and trying to overcome the attraction he has for Abby than there needs to be.

It’s a battle of wills within Cale, and the end result tempers a lot of the story. I’m not sure that works well, but if there will be a second book, and it appears so, then that part of the plot arc will be interesting in how he deals with it. Coupled to that, there are a lot of little hints about Cale as well that don’t quite play out in this work. They are a clear hook into the next and I hope they are used well there.

The erotica falls into a series of dreamscapes in which Cale has his way with Abby, but as well, she responds to that in an active, not passive way, and it was that blending of dominant personalities that I think held me in the work. There isn’t so much a “use” on Abby as it is Cale being drawn to her, seeking out her needs and fulfilling them.

There are some minor issues in the work, a few spelling errors, but nothing serious. One section of the work when Abby was being pulled in several directions at once felt overdone and didn’t add a lot I felt to the story. But the erotica is well written, the characters are quite strong and powerful, and the story, while leaning on the rather popular “billionaire finding love” trope, manages to keep things from going over the top, becoming silly, or worse, a soap opera instead of a real story. Here story matters, it drives everything else and I enjoyed that a lot.

Four out of five pitchforks.

An interesting story well told. Good characters, a nice air of mystery, discovery, and in some ways, a hauntingly direct need to not believe in the possible. I like the beginning, I hope the follow book is as good as this one was.

Most of all, I want to see if my thoughts about Abby herself, the clues that I seem to see, are the ones that I believe them to be and where that takes both her and Cale.



Oct 05 2015

3,000 Tales – The Book by TeraS

Today marks the 3,000th thought, idea, comment, or some other thing that I have posted on the Tale. I have, to be honest with myself, a lot of stories that are unfinished here on the Tale already, and, as well, there are a lot of unfinished stories that I have not placed here.

There are stories I want to tell, but, I never think they are good enough, or I have other problems with them that make me set them aside and put them away, perhaps to be seen again when I have some inspiration … or something.

I feel like that is a problem for me. I feel like what I do share isn’t really as good as it could be, should be. I never see that my writing is something that tells a good story, that there is something within the words that matters in some way, shape or form.

However, sometimes, just sometimes, there are stories that manage to get out past my fingers that are close to what I’d like to say …


The Book
By TeraS


The book came into existence with the cover: two thin pieces of bound leather, the space in-between a void, without form or substance. When it appeared, it seemed lost, forlorn, out of place. On the front cover was a symbol, carved into the leather with a loving hand, an expression of the things that would appear within.

There was to be love, passions, desires … the things that mattered in the moments that they did so. There was to be amusement, a bit of teasing. Of course there would be seduction, temptation, the needs of the soul in all of the things that the symbol on the cover told.

The cover had been sketched upon, the leather cut, burnished, shaped until there was the clear image of a familiar red heart that bore a pair of small, cute horns and a mischievous tail: her symbol, the one that meant something to her, to those that knew of it, that understood what it meant for the always.

Turning the fragile, almost barely-there creation over, on the rear there was no symbol. Instead a feminine hand had etched into the leather a series of words. The script flowed; the loops, arcs, swirls and lines were a mirror of the mind that controlled that hand. To some, the words might seem jumbled, disordered—perhaps a reflection of the way in which her mind raced at speeds that her hands could not keep up with, of how the thoughts, needs, stories within wanted to get out, be told, be shared for the simple reason that they needed to be. But in spite of how messy they might be, there were things to tell and the back cover, the words upon it, tried to tell them as best they could be.

For uncounted time, more than the book itself could know, nothing changed. The book remained as it was, a cover, nothing within to be held by it. No pages telling of dreams, no paragraphs of desires. No thoughts or words there for they had not come into being.

Then, somehow, things started to change. A single sheet, a thin page with a little line of story upon it, materialized from nowhere, standing straight up between the open covers, finally being bound to them. The page then fell down, resting upon the inside back cover where it could be read.

And it was.

The page then turned over, lying upon the inside front cover. On the back of the page, another few lines appeared, another bit of story, of thought, of meaning materializing there. The words were rushed, talking about needs and temptations: a tale of the beginning, where all books must start.

For a time the page was alone between the covers. The words were there to be seen, but so few, so little, that it might have well been the covers alone still. Then, once more, things changed. Pages started to appear, one after the next, attaching themselves to the cover, falling one way, then the other, each page allowing the next to appear.

The pages were full of errors: spelling mistakes, grammar that didn’t fit, dialog that was laughable, to be kind. But the pages kept coming, the words upon them expressing the thoughts of the mind that drew them there. And the thoughts were so profound, so amazing, so inspiring that none of what the world called “errors” truly mattered … except in her mind.

After a time, again, the pages changed. Mixed among the stories came images, expressions of fantasies that spoke not in a shout, but in a soft purr that drew others to the words that seemed to have sired the images. The images purred, but the words sang of seduction, how it felt to submit, to allow her to touch, to caress, to whisper of the fantasies unspoken but to the one who held them within.

Still the pages came, the stories with their mistakes, the odd thing not expressed in the right way. The book became thick with the pages, the spine widening to accommodate the pages that continued to appear.

Then the ink upon the pages, usually black in colour, was met with the occasional burst of red, red that drew attention to the little mistakes, clarified the thoughts, took the stampede of thoughts that came from her mind and settled them into their places. The red was mixed with the black, as in the same way that it had been within the stories themselves. The words became more than they had been, the meaning behind them clearer.

Perhaps, from time to time, the red that was guided by another hand paused, considered if the meaning of the words, the passions within, the desires, the temptations, were changed in some way by the red. The black never did so, not once. The black on the pages bound itself to the red, the two merging, the black now shining with the red within, the words now a reflection, fully, of the red and black that dwelled within the mind that told the stories and continued in doing so.

The book was no longer a forlorn thing. It held more than just words and images. Between the pages things started to appear, items that bookmarked moments in the storytelling that flourished there: a single white feather, a leather collar, a pair of red socks; things that made sense only to the mind that saw them, but were part of what made the words themselves, the stories, the meaning, everything to her.

The book was a little worn around the edges now, having being paged through so many times. Some of the older pages were dog-eared, others turning colour slightly. But the words remained, not fading, not changing from what they held and meant for all time. If anything, somehow, they became more vivid with each reading. They told of the wishes of the mind that wrote them, how she wished to do the right thing, to be the best she could be, for that mattered the most of all. Within the words, mixed in a way that wasn’t always clear to others, was a silent hope, a wish, one that she would never know.

The book was special, more so than might have been first understood. It was more than a book, it was a portal between the worlds, between two souls, forever connected. It was … and it was more.

Where the book rested, awaiting the next page to be added, a slim feminine hand reached out to turn the page. Her blue eyes read the words, her soft lips smiled as she saw the meaning of them. Her red, heart-tipped tail moved to touch the book, to touch the things between the pages. She laughed at the moments she was meant to, sighed a little at the thoughts of the one that wrote the words, and marvelled at those words.

She brushed a stray lock of her blond hair behind one ear, in a way that the soul that wrote the words would recognize as being where she gained that particular quirk of character. She wished that she was there, to tell what she thought, to explain that the words didn’t have to so perfect as they were meant to be. For they already were, in the most important way.

Another page appeared, being attached to the book, the stories continuing.

She smiled, reading her daughter’s thoughts. Knowing that the stories were not done, the need to share, to offer, to give of herself would never come to a close. For the book would always have room, between the covers, to tell more of what she wanted to say.

Being Tera’s mother, she would always know those stories, for the book would see to that …

… always …

Oct 04 2015

A Review of Evil Lust by Darla Dunbar

Evil Lust by Darla Dunbar

Evil Lust by Darla Dunbar

If a story summary mentions a succubus, a reader would expect that a succubus appears in the work they are considering. Beyond that, if the succubus in the summary seems to be a focal point of the story, then one might expect her to speak, be described, and if nothing else, at least be there in the story, to mean something and to do something in it.

However, when the succubus appears for two paragraphs, isn’t described, doesn’t say a word, and the battle with the heroine isn’t even described as well… That’s quite disappointing. When things like this happen my question is: What was the point of the succubus being in the story in the first place?

This work tells the story of:

Henry and Claire are meant to be together. But a succubus has taken over Henry’s actions. Under her spell, Henry has succumbed to lusting after Charlotte, the human form that the succubus has assumed. If Claire were to find out, then their marriage will be ruined beyond repair. It is up to Valtina to break the succubus’ spell and clear Henry’s memory of any guilt that would haunt his love for Claire forever.

Valtina is working with others to stop evil from taking love away from the world. Being successful so far, she is given the task to save a couple who’s love is being threatened by a succubus. She is warned it will not be easy, that she is facing her greatest challenge so far and is determined to win for the sake of love.

I was expecting a story in which a succubus appeared, there was some kind of conflict followed by a resolution by the heroine to save the day and then the story would continue from there. I expected to learn something about the succubus herself, why she picked this couple, and even beyond that, an explanation about what else was going on with the evil that seems to be in this work.

I thought that as I was coming into this work in the middle of a series, that would be a problem, but there’s enough told about what is going on that I didn’t feel like I was lost in the story as a whole. Where I did get lost was how quickly the succubus appeared, then vanished, and the rest of the work turned into an extended love scene.

That’s a problem because, reading the summary, I expected the succubus to be core to the story, to be in the work for a significant part of it. I thought there would be a description of her, there isn’t only her eyes turning red is told. I thought she would speak, talk to the heroine, something, but that didn’t happen either. Not one word was spoken. Being that the succubus was supposed to be the equal of the heroine, I thought there would be some sort of battle for control, a moment where the heroine would be in peril, something. Again this didn’t happen. The “fight” was one sentence and then it was over, the heroine leaving to continue dealing with the husband and wife while another character was dropped in to deal with the succubus.

From the point of view of wanting to read about a succubus in some sort of way, this work didn’t manage that. Because of this, it was difficult to see the reason for the succubus to be in the story in the first place. This is not really a story with a succubus, it is a story with a passing mention of one.

Setting that aside, the balance of the work was uneven, the dialog was a little stilted, read oddly, and if you spoke the dialog out loud it didn’t really fit well. The story read very much like a romance novel with the heroine of the book being a voyeuristic part of the overall plot once her role in “saving” the marriage was over. There really wasn’t much that held me in the story, and even when more of the overall plot came out and some of the secrets of the heroine came out that wasn’t enough to keep my interest.

Two pitchforks out of five.

Little appearance of a succubus, a story that didn’t hold me. There needs to be more substance than just the erotica and here that wasn’t to be seen…



Oct 04 2015

A Review of Muff Diving Massage by Katz O’Connor

Muff Diving Massage by Katz O'Connor

Muff Diving Massage by Katz O’Connor

Sometimes I shake my head when I read the titles of some published works. The title is obviously meant to garner attention, to be titillating, to draw attention. Then, generally, the book summary is so far over the top to be almost laughably so. Sometimes all that does is reinforce that the work itself isn’t much and one shouldn’t expect much from it.

The problem is, however, when the actual writing, story, heat and characters are so much better and deserve a better title and book summary to give the work a chance to succeed. That can make a huge difference and it is one that should be. Because.

  • Title: Muff Diving Massage
  • Author: Katz O’Connor
  • Length: 26 Pages
  • Publishing Date: November 20, 2014
  • This work at Amazon.com

The work tells of:

A mysterious, otherworldly lesbian massage parlour that redefines happy endings! Perky birthday girl Amy is as straight as they come, and ecstatic after her boyfriend surprises her with a ticket to the mysterious new massage parlour with a secret. However, Amy soon finds herself slowly succumbing her stripped, oiled body on the massage table to a persuasive, hit lesbian masseuse with a wicked tongue! With the tables turned on Amy, when this raw, raunchy happy ending comes, she might leave with new priorities – and a boyfriend who’ll just have to go!

Amy gets a gift from her boyfriend for a spa visit. She finds her way there and discovers that the spa isn’t what she expected it to be. And after the Madame and the Masseuse finish with Amy, she’s not the Amy that she was before.

The story is a bit unclear on what the two women that Amy encounters are exactly. Considering that their names are Lucy and Lily, and what Lucy does to Amy, it is entirely possible that they are Succubi, but that really isn’t touched on very much in the story. They are both very sexual in nature and poise, which comes out really well in the story, but overtly there is no sign of tails or horns or other things that really prove this to be true.

The story is, as a whole, a hot flash with a good deal of story to tell and I feel that worked quite well. The story leading up to Amy’s encounter is very well done and I liked that part of the work very much. The heat in the hot flash is very good with a bit of what seems to be mind control erotica mixed into things, and it is that subtle mind control that, for me, makes Lucy very much a Succubus and that is true of Lily as well.

The work is very well written and I enjoyed the story as a whole up until the climax of the work and most of the aftermath where questions are asked and Amy’s view of the universe is changed and she is as well in many ways. Where things fall apart for me is the last page of the story which really makes no sense and doesn’t really add anything to the story. The ending feels wrong, goes off on a tangent and as such just hurts what otherwise is a well told and hot story.

That shouldn’t have been and really if the story ended in the moment when Amy’s views of herself and her world just start to change that would have been perfect. But the story goes that little bit too much further and it shows.

I’d like to see more about this universe however, not so much Amy but rather Lily and Lucy if for no other reason than to define who they are, what they are, and what their relationship is. I think that would be a really good series in many ways.

Three out of five pitchforks.

Get rid of the title and the summary. This isn’t an adult movie, there is a lot more to this work than that and that is what should be the emphasis. The story stands on its own, it works well, and it is a lovely, passionate hot flash. But there is much that takes away from that before the first word is read and that shouldn’t happen.



Oct 04 2015

A Review of Jade, Cody, And The Two Succubi by Joyce Melbourne

Jade, Cody, And The Two Succubi by Joyce Melbourne

Jade, Cody, And The Two Succubi by Joyce Melbourne

Sometimes the events in a story are confused. By that I mean it is somewhat unclear to understand who, or more often, what they are at a particular moment. Sometimes the title of a story confuses things further when the reader expects one thing because of the title and instead something different seems to be happening in the work.

There can be wonderful heat, and a mystery to think about which both make the story better that’s true. But confusing the reader doesn’t always work well even if the mystery is supposed to do so.

  • Title: Jade, Cody, And The Two Succubi
  • Author: Joyce Melbourne
  • Length: 10 Pages
  • ASIN: B00PYW3YT8
  • Publishing Date: November 20, 2014
  • This work at Amazon.com

The work tells of:

When a couple finds their sex drive lacking, a nighttime visitation by a ghostly being or two, surprises them both.

Jade and Cody have been together for some time, but of late the bliss they have enjoyed is waining, ebbing away, turning to dust. A chance meeting over a newspaper and things change as a new entity enters their lives and kindles their passions in different ways.

Overall the work is a hot flash piece of erotica that reads more like a ghost story. There is a twist in the story that I thought worked really well at the end, but with that came a lot of questions and some confusion I felt in the aftermath of that. Some of the ideas and assumptions made in the story don’t quite fit with the story title and that’s a bit of a shame.

The main part of the confusion for me is in the story title which says there should be two succubi in this story. At one point Jade asks her unseen visitor if they are male or not and the answer given seems to say that they are male. As such, at least one incubus appears in this story. Later on Cody has some intimate moments with another being, and it’s quite clear that they are female. So, sadly, the title of this work doesn’t quite connect with the story itself.

Still, the story has a lot of mystery mixed into the erotica, which I liked, and in doing so a really good story comes into play. There isn’t quite enough time spent on the questions raised at the beginning of the story, and in part some of those questions revolve around the explanation of what an incubus is. It’s also a bit frustrating that nothing is mentioned about what a succubus is, and more importantly, if they are different in their needs and desires than what an incubus wants.

What results from this confusion and mysteriousness in the story is that the story gets pushed to the side when the erotica begins. The passions in those moments are wonderfully told, the characters change, slightly, but they do emotionally, and the twist in the story comes at a point which is unexpected and neatly told.

The problem is that while the erotica is well done, the story isn’t brought out as much as it could have been I think. There are a lot of missed opportunities to tell a wider story, to delve into the mystery of what is happening around Jade and Cody. The work reads very much like an opening chapter to a longer work that pauses on a revelation and then… it ends. That’s a shame and I do wish that the author had written more than what is given.

Three and a half out of five pitchforks.

While this is a complete story as it stands, it is, tragically, far too short. The characters are well told, the mystery is fascinating and the questions left in the aftermath of the passions in the story are many and more. Building on all that is given would, I think easily, make for a far better and richer story.



Oct 03 2015

A comparison of Succubus colouring

A YouTube today of an artist colouring another artist’s line art that I thought was interesting, and rather informative for me at least. What’s more interesting is that they also linked to the original colours and I think that comparison is something to ponder over…

And if you cannot see the video here, please try this link:


Here are the two works of art to compare, the original is on the left and the one in the video is on the right.

You can find the original work here on DeviantArt, and the second work can be found on DeviantArt here.

I have to admit that I am rather torn between the two versions of this art. While the original has a lovely mood to it, the second work I like for the striking colours. I think that the darker colours mute the art itself a bit, almost hiding some of the art in the shadows. I wonder about merging the two ideas: Dark background and light succubus herself. It might be a better look but I’m not really sure…

But as I said, I really don’t know which version I like better as they both, in their own ways, appeal to me… Indecision is a lovely thing isn’t it?



Oct 02 2015

Is Horseshoes and Hand Grenades the game of Lost Girl?

I think either I didn’t quite understand things correctly this week on Lost Girl, or my definition of one’s “inner justice” isn’t what the writers of this episode came up with. There is such a thing as one’s inner truth, the single most important thought that we hold, no matter what, and what it means to each of us.That can be really a complicated, involved thing to explain, to understand, and to bring out in the moments when it matters the most.

To say one’s inner truth is: “I messed up” isn’t a point of inner justice, it’s a statement of understanding, perhaps at a stretch it is an inner truth, but it can’t be inner justice. There’s a stark difference in that “inner justice” should explain why one makes a decision, why it matters to them, and why they defend their actions as a result. Thinking about this in terms of Bo, I think that a better description might be “Doing the right thing for the right reasons” as that seems to be an ongoing theme for Bo as the series has gone on. Turning that towards “I messed up” doesn’t really fit the series, or Bo as a character either.

The episode did manage to close off a few plot threads, though getting rid of Zee and Hera was very anticlimactic after the building up. As well, the rush to get Dyson in bed with Alycia and then crush that plot was distasteful too. Then, of course, the plot of Lauren breaking up with Bo, which has been used before, got trotted out again for a reason that makes no sense, doesn’t follow well i the story arcs, and just serves to isolate Bo further.

It seems like the point of this episode was to take Bo from her support structure and toss her to the winds, and all things considered, that did happen for the most part. But in all honesty the entire episode felt rushed, uneven, and as a whole I found Bo doing far too many things that did not make any sense at all. Possibly the most aggravating moment being at the beginning of the episode when she told Tamsin she was going to get information from Hades and keep things from him and yet a single question opened the flood gates. There seems to be a few points in the episode where the writers forgot what happened in a previous scene and went onwards without explaining, or dealing with, the issues raised.

Having Bo confront Zee and Hera… really wasn’t. As well, I hate to tell the person writing the summaries for television, but Zee is not an old enemy. More so, after all of the preceding episodes, events, actions taken and so on, the final encounter between Bo and Zee turns into a hug and a good luck. That was really disappointing.

Then comes Lauren, no longer “Fae”, just a “poor human” and “not worthy of Bo” which just makes no sense at all. Conflict between Bo and Lauren is fine, but this amounted to taking a major plot line and dumping it into the trash. If they get back together in the next episode, then what was the point? Pulling Bo apart just to have a rant at Hades was really disappointing and there were better ways to have a confrontation honestly than what happened.

This then follows into Tamsin getting hooked up with Bo and if that means anything, amounts to anything, or is just a little tease and nothing more. Somehow that feels like this episode. A tease before something better comes along. At least I’m hoping so.

The twelfth episode of the fifth season, also episode seventy-three of the Lost Girl TV series was this week. Bo goes to court and then watches Zee and Hera go down the drain before starting to play with horseshoes. Dyson gets naked with Alycia, but then has to deal with things not going his way again. Trick does some reading while Tamsin plays name the movie and Lauren decides that running away is the better part of… nothing.


Lost Girl Logo

This is the twelfth review of the fifth season of of Lost Girl. A summary of this episode has been added to the SuccuWiki, but won’t be adding my commentary to the articles there as that is what the Tale is for….

Bo finds out when you go to court, you are facing your…


Judgement Fae


The episode opens with a recap of the previous episode including: Bo and Lauren kissing, Bo asking in a voice over why Lauren did not tell Evony that she was a Conduit, followed by Evony confronting Lauren and asking why she did not return her to being Fae when she had the chance, Lauren replying that she wanted to test her serum, Evony then asking who Lauren was testing the serum on. Trick is then shown telling Tamsin about the last time Hades was vulnerable, that being when he was banished to Tartarus. Stacey and Tamsin are then seen at the Valkyrie Academy, Tamsin commenting that the portal to Valhalla would only open for teachers. Acacia is then seen entering Tamsin’s classroom in the past followed by Tamsin telling Acacia that Hades wants to build an army, Acacia telling Tamsin to be the General that Hades wants. Hades is then seen leaving his isolation cell at will with Tamsin’s voice warning him that she will protect her friends followed by Bo wondering what game Hades is playing and Tamsin telling Bo there is only one way to find out.

The episode begins with Bo (Anna Silk) in the shower who is soon joined by Lauren (Zoie Palmer), the two being intimate for a time before kissing and then Lauren feeding on Bo’s Chi for a moment before Bo asks: “Is this really happening?”, Lauren saying nothing before they kiss again, but the second time Lauren does not seem to feed on Bo. The two are then seen walking through Bo’s home, Lauren commenting that she is hungry, adding: “Does Chi sucking always give a bad case of the munchies?” Bo does not reply to this but when Lauren asks if she wants pizza, Bo tells Lauren that he already called for pizza shortly before. Lauren brushes this off, claiming to be “kidding” about doing so. Bo answers: “Ha” and Lauren asks: “What? You don’t think I have a future in standup?” Bo replies: “I wouldn’t put it past you, I never imagined you’d be Fae.” Lauren tells Bo that she isn’t quite Fae, and only is if she is touching one. Bo asks what happens if Lauren does touch a Far for too long and Lauren jokes: “I explode into confetti. It’s actually quite spectacular, want to see?” but then tells Bo that she cannot give an answer to the question, only promising to do some testing to find out. Bo then comments: “On yourself? Isn’t that what guinea pigs are for?” Lauren promises she is taking “every precaution” but Bo notes: “and I am every bit worried.” Lauren then tries to tell Bo not to worry, starting to explain that “after we found the TTV…” Bo interrupts at this point and asks who else was involved, which forces Lauren to admit that Hades had assisted her in finding the answer she needed, but also adding that she would have come up with the answer on her own eventually. Bo tells Lauren that Hades is planning “something” and is concerned that Lauren being changed into a Conduit might be part of his plans. Lauren brushes this concern off explaining: “I will be one step ahead.” Lauren then tries to calm Bo’s concerns telling her: “I know this is overwhelming for you, but this is a step in the right direction. The forever direction.” Bo again warns Lauren that Hades is not to be trusted, but Lauren tells Bo: “It feels like the issue is that you don’t trust me.” At this point their conversation is interrupted by a knock at the door which Bo goes to answer, commenting: “That must be the pizza.”

The scene then shifts to what appears to be a blacksmith’s shop. Zee () is seen entering, carrying the Aegis Shield which she gives to the man working there warning him: “Don’t fail me.” He replies: “Sundown tomorrow it will be done.” and Zee leaves a moment later after giving him a harsh look. Moments later, Zee is seen leaving an elevator and encountering a woman (Nengi Adoki) that recognizes her human host. Zee sighs: “Not again.” then asks: “So, are you a screamer or the type that is going to get all emotional?” When the woman comments: “I thought you were dead?” Zee answers: “No.” then snaps the woman’s neck, walking past the fallen body and adding: “That’s you.”

After the opening credits, Alycia (Lisa Marcos) is seen making breakfast at Dyson’s home, Dyson (Kristen Holden-Ried) entering moments later and sitting at the table with her. In the midst of eating, Dyon’s phone rings and after speaking on the phone for a moment comments to Alycia: “Work. Something’s come up.” Alycia asks with a smile if Dyson wants his coffee to go, Dyson picking up his mug and replying: “No. I’ll take it like this.” After telling Alycia he will see her that evening, Dyson moves to leave, but Alycia stops him to hand over his wallet that Dyson left behind. Dyson thanks her, commenting: “I’m an idiot” before the two share a kiss without thinking about it, then pausing a moment, looking at each other before Dyson apologizes, Alycia telling Dyson: “No. It’s my fault.” Dyson ends the moment by telling Alycia they will talk later and then leaves, Alycia turning away and smiling as he does so.

The scene then moves to the Dal Riata where Dyson is showing surveillance camera footage of Zee killing the woman to Bo, Trick (Richard Howland) and Tamsin (Rachel Skarsten). Dyson informs them all that there were no witnesses to the event while Bo cannot believe that Zee has returned as she: “saw Zee vanish with the painting just like Jack (Hades) said she would.” Tamsin sighs: “There’s your answer” and Bo replies: “Jack lied to me.” Tamsin comments that Zee and Hades must be working together, Trick adding: “Brothers in arms together again.” Bo decides to confront Hades which brings Dyson to comment: “You don’t think he’s going to lie again?” Bo replies: “Oh I’m pretty sure he will which is why we need to play ignorant to the fact that Zee is back.” Tamsin smiles as she muses: “The old he can’t know that you know cause if he knows that you know he’ll know. Yeah.” After everyone gives Tamsin an odd look she adds: “You know?” Trick wonders why Zee was at the courthouse and Tamsin points out that it is the place were the Ancients came back to Earth through the elevator crash which provided them with host bodies. Bo comments there has to be something special about the courthouse, saying that it “must be sitting on something big.” Tamsin muses: “Lucky courthouse” which makes Trick chuckle and Tamsin explains: “I swear that must be my inside voice.” Trick tells the group he will: “Dig up any archaeological history I can find on the courthouse” as Bo sighs: “First stop, old man liar.”

Lauren is then seen attending to Hera’s (Noam Jenkins) unconscious body with a nurse (Elisa Atristain-Garcia), checking for any kind of reaction from touching the soles of his feet, but has no reaction at all from doing so. After ordering some further tests, Lauren asks for test results from a “Patient X” and the nurse informs Lauren that she has been carrying them under her arm for some time. Lauren laughs about this, then looks over the results, a concerned expression coming to her as she does so, commenting to herself: “Early stage Parkinson’s?” The nurse adds: “The patient’s cognitive decline is increasing rapidly. It’s not looking good.” Lauren sighs: “No. It isn’t.” When the nurse asks who the patient is, Lauren replies: “No one.” and then walks away, Bo entering and approaching Lauren moments later. Lauren begins the conversation by telling Bo that she is not “in the mood to talk about last night.” When Bo tells Lauren she is there to question Hades, Lauren asks: “When you need his help it’s okay, but when I do…” Bo tells Lauren: “This is different. Because we are talking about you. The woman that I love. How can someone so smart… I just don’t get why you are so willing to give up who you are to be Fae.” Lauren sighs: “No, I guess you don’t.” and then starts to leave, but Bo asks Lauren to talk about what is going on, Lauren telling her: “What else is there to say?” and then leaving the room.

The scene then moves to Hades (Eric Roberts) in his isolation cell making a sketch of Bo as she stands outside glaring at him. Hades tells Bo: “I only brought the horse to the water, I had no part in making her drink.” Bo answers: “Horse shit.” but Hades continues: “I admit I helped her with the solution, but I had no idea she was going to use it on herself.” Bo tells Hades: “You are messing with someone’s life.” Hades tells Bo: “She wanted this more than anything else in the world.” Hades then asks about Zee, wondering why Bo hasn’t asked about her and Bo replies: “Why did you lie to me?” Hades explains: “I told you the painting would banish Zee, I never told you to where.” Bo sighs: “So you played me.” Hades tells Bo he protected her from Zee using the painting against her. There is the sound of something breaking in the distance and when Bo looks at Hades he comments: “Don’t look at me.” Bo considers him a moment, then goes off to see what made the noise. Bo then discovers Zee laying on the floor, gasping and looking frightened. When Bo picks up a knife and threatens her, Zee scrambles to her feet and cowers, asking who Bo is. Bo does not believe this, thinking it an act of some kind and asks: “Cut the crap Zee, what are you doing here?” Zee continues to be frightened, crying out that she does not know what Bo is talking about. Bo approaches closer and then whispers: “Elizabeth?”

After a commercial break, Elizabeth is seen at the Dal Riata eating while Trick, Bo, Tamsin and Dyson watch her, Tamsin commenting: “I thought I could eat.” Bo comments: “Feeding off adoration must not feed the human appetite.” When Trick asks if they are sure it is not Zee, Dyson replies: “There’s no scent of Fae in there, it’s all human.” Bo wonders where Zee went and then goes to talk to Elizabeth in an attempt to find that out, Tamsin, Trick and Dyson following along to watch. Bo asks Elizabeth what she remembers about Zee controlling her body and Elizabeth explains: “I tried to block most of it out” adding that she hummed old Madonna songs and tried not to see what Zee was doing most of the time, and thinking about her fiancé, which gives her pause for a moment, then she whispers: “I… She… killed him didn’t she?” Bo tells Elizabeth that she can’t be hurt, but they need to figure out what Zee was doing in the courthouse. When Elizabeth says she can’t remember, Dyson shows Elizabeth a picture of the woman that Zee killed, Elizabeth identifying her as Claire. Elizabeth starts to hyperventilate and panic over this before Tamsin tells her: “Okay, what happened to you is horrible there’s no denying that it sucks to be used against your will. But it’s time to be a hero and not a victim, so maybe you should stop crying and start remembering.” When everyone looks at Tamsin she shrugs: “What? Tough love.” Elizabeth calms down enough to remember a smell she describes as “musty and hot, not Florida hot, fire in my face hot and… banging. Like someone hammering on a furnace. I think there was something about a shield? I think she was giving it to someone?” Trick comments: “Aegis shield.” Trick then opens a book he has been carrying and explains that Zee likely saw Hephaestus, also calling him Hepha, adding that he is the son of Zeus and Hera. Trick explains that Hepha is the forger of weaponry for the Ancients. Dyson wonders why Zee would give up her shield of protection and Trick explains that “Hepha grants only one weapon per God. Zeus could be trading it in for something stronger, more deadly.” Bo comes to to conclusion they need to search the courthouse, but Trick explains that to see Hepha, one must “be granted an audience with one of the Erinyes, the ministers of Justice. Tisiphone, Megaera and…” Elizabeth asks: “Not Judge Megaera?” adding: “Everyone knows her.” When Bo asks what Megaera is like. Elizabeth replies: “I don’t use the Lord’s name in vein often but she is one mean son-of-a-you-know-what.” When Dyson comments: “You didn’t use the Lord’s name in vein”, Elizabeth replies: “Exactly.”

Bo and Tamsin are then seen walking through the courthouse, Bo calling Lauren’s phone and leaving a message for Lauren to call her back. Tamsin comments when the call is over: “Makes me glad I’m single.” When Bo starts to apologize, Tamsin assures Bo that it’s fine and she is “very happy for you and the Doc.” When Bo asks if she is sure, Tamsin replies: “We’re friends, we’re not friends with benefits.” Elizabeth then interrupts through earpieces that both Bo and Tamsin are wearing with a sound check and when Bo asks if she can hear them, Elizabeth replies: “This is so Mission Impossible!” After Tamsin tells Elizabeth to focus she describes Megaera as: “Elegant, like an older Kate Winslet in Titanic. Or you can always count on her statement necklace.” When Bo asks for something more specific, Elizabeth adds: “She likes to eat her lunch under that super weird, super offensive painting.” At that moment, from across the hall, Megaera (Mimi Kuzyk) is seen eating her lunch. Elizabeth also tells Bo to speak in short sentences and to use legalize in doing so. Bo comments: “I object. No, really, that’s all I’ve got.” When Elizabeth comments: “We should Roxanne this”, Tamsin growls: “If she makes one more movie reference I’m cutting her off.” When Bo asks: “Roxanne was a movie?” Elizabeth answers: “Oh come on! Steve Martin? Daryl Hanna? Cyrano De Bergerac?” At this point Bo and Tamsin approach Megaera and Bo greets her by saying hello, but Megaera says: “No.” When Bo is confused, Megaera continues: “You don’t just waltz over here Miss Dennis, interrupt my lunch, and ask for an audience with Hephaestus.” Bo answers in a chastised voice: “No, of course not.” After complimenting Megaera on her egg salad sandwich there is a pause while Megaera puts her lunch down and then tells Bo: “Okay. An audience is given only by proving oneself worthy.” Bo asks: “What are we talking? Slay a dragon? Swallowing a centipede?” Megaera says nothing, but casually points to her side were a pair of doors have appeared out of thin air. When Bo moves to enter, Tamsin following, Megaera warns that only Bo is allowed to enter. Tamsin backs away as Megaera tells Bo: “Your test awaits you.” Bo replies as she looks at the doors: “Will I get time to study?” and when she looks back to Megaera, she has vanished, leaving her lunch where she had been sitting behind. Tamsin tells Bo: “I’ll be here if you need me.” and then leaves as Bo turns to the doors and enters.

Once though the doors, Bo finds herself in a courtroom, Megaera the presiding Judge and the two parties appearing before her in the room waiting. Bo pauses to look at one of the parties who sighs: “Great. This is just what I needed. I really hope you are better than the last three lawyers. This business is my life. Don’t screw it up for me.” He then introduces himself as Phillip (Ennis Esmer) and offers his hand, but Bo excuses herself and approaches Megaera. Bo tells her: “I think there’s been a mistake, I’m not a lawyer.” Megaera replies: “Succeed for your client and you will be granted an audience. Fail and the only thing you’ll be granted is a one-way ticket to Myth.” Bo asks: “Please tell me that’s an island in Greece.” Megaera sighs and explains: “Myth is a realm of eternal stasis. Limbo? If you will.” Bo asks: “Can’t a girl cut a deal?” but Megaera tells Bo to take her seat as Megaera calls the court to session. As Bo walks away, she tells Elizabeth: “Hey Roxanne? You’re on.”

After another commercial break, Bo is acting as a lawyer and asking questions of Phillip about the case at hand, which revolves around Max Pearson (Steve Arbuckle), selling some software to a rival company. After being coached by Tamsin and Elizabeth, Bo completes her questioning and then listens to Max’s Lawyer (Harry Judge) cross-examine Phillip, making some errors in objecting to the questioning, and then listens has Phillip is asked about how he treated Max as part of the company and why he acted in the way he did and why Max did not appear as a partner in company literature and other venues.

The scene then switches to the Dal Riata where Dyson is drinking and Trick asks what is going on, eventually piecing together that while Dyson claimed Alycia to protect her, he has feelings for her. Trick tells Dyson: “Bo will always be your greatest love, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for you to love another.” Dyson replies: “That’s not the way of my kind. There are rules.” Trick muses: “For thousands of years I lived by the rules of the Light and the Dark. Because of that steadfast resolution, I tore my family apart. Sometimes the heart does what it likes despite what the rules say.”

Meanwhile, back at Dyson’s gym, the kitchen is filled with smoke as the fire detector is sounding. Dyson rushes in, calling out Alycia’s name and she appears from within the smoke, carrying a fire extinguisher, and uses it to put out the fire on the stove. When the fire is out, Alycia explains: “I made dinner.” Dyson answers: “Yeah. I could smell it from around the block. Yeah. Roast chicken.” Alycia says that it was, calling herself an idiot, but Dyson tells her: “It’s the thought that counts.” and then suggests that they order in something for dinner. Alycia stares at Dyson for a moment, then moves closer to him. Dyson asks: “Wait. Shouldn’t we talk about this?” Alycia answers: “No” as the two kiss and the scene ends.

Back in the courtroom, Elizabeth tells Bo that they will win the case as the law in on their side. On the stand, Max testifies that he tried to bring Phillip into the agreement he made. Bo then is allowed to question Max and she asks he stole company property and sold it to another company. Max explains that he owns half of the company and he has the right to sell an idea that isn’t valued by his company to another. Bo is pressed towards one line of questioning by Elizabeth, but Bo instead turns the questioning towards the relationship between Phillip and Max, revealing that Max felt he wasn’t being valued and Phillip felt he was trying to protect Max. Max asks Phillip who made it his role to protect him and after a moment Phillip drops the lawsuit, telling Max he can do what he wants to. The two then reconcile, agreeing to work together towards their mutual goal as equals. Megaera then dismisses the case and the court is adjourned. Megaera then begins to leave the courtroom, Bo following and asking: “That’s it? I know I didn’t win, but they worked it out in the end. Doesn’t that make us all winners in the end?” Megaera replies: “Unfortunately no.” Bo then realizes: “It wasn’t about winning. This was about me.” Megaera explains: “My courtroom is designed to reveal one’s inner justice. Only then can Hephaestus forge a weapon befitting a warrior. Ugly bastard.” Bo tries to explain: “I have always tried to protect people, but, maybe the wrong way. I should be supporting them. Supporting Lauren, that is how I will protect her.” Megaera smiles: “Well done Bo. You have found your inner justice. Use it wisely.” After Megaera points at the doors leading from the courtroom, Bo walks towards them, passes through and then enters Hephaestus’ forge.

In the forge, Bo walks towards Hephaestus, pausing near to him and calling out to him. Hepha replies: “You must be Bo. I am Hephaestus.” Hephaestus (Christopher Russell) is revealed as a handsome man, not at all an ugly being. Bo comments: “More like Hot-Facestue. You are the ugliest of all of the Ancients?” Hepha turns away, telling Bo: “By far. Olympus is a place of sublime beauty. Look away if you must.” Bo walks closer, telling him: “I came for Zee. What is she planning?” Hepha looks to the side, revealing a hatch mounted in the floor with a wheel lock on it. He explains: “My fire fuses with the icy waters of the well, and from the Yawning Gap, the place of Myth, I forge a weapon worthy of the God before me.” He then looks at Bo and bows towards her. Bo tells Hepha that she knows that Zee visited him and asks what Zee wanted. Hepha replies: “Ask her yourself.” Bo then turns around to see Lauren standing behind her. Bo asks Lauren what she is doing there, and Lauren replies: “Deceiving isn’t it? Turns out not all blondes have more fun.” revealing that it is Zee within Lauren’s body addressing Bo.

After still another commercial break, we return to the forge where Zee explains that when she discovered that Lauren was a Conduit, she decided that Lauren would make “the perfect new vessel. She struggled, but held on just long enough.” Bo sighs: “So that’s what happens when you hold on for too long.” Zee walks past Bo and gloats: “Your girlfriend went from part-time conduit to full-time Ancient. I’d call that a promotion.” Zee then moves to open the hatch, telling Bo: “It’s time for a wake up call.”

Back at Lauren’s clinic, Hera awakens, the nurse attempting to contact Lauren to tell her what is happening. The nurse tries to talk to who she thinks is Kevin, trying to communicate with him and calm him down. However, he begins to panic, demanding to see Alycia, before dropping to the floor, seemingly unconscious again. The nurse then opens the isolation ward to help, but when she is close to Hera, he opens his mouth and a swarm of locusts attacks her as the scene ends.

Returning to the forge, Bo tells Zee: “Get the Fae out of my girlfriend.” and Zee answers: “You need to listen to me. I am your only only chance against Hades.” Bo answers: “You knew I wouldn’t hurt Lauren.” When Bo asks what Zee wants, she explains: “To warn you that Hades might seem benign, but he’s a master manipulator. He’ll infiltrate every inch of your life.” Bo comments: “Oh, you just hijack girlfriends.” Nonplussed, Zee continues: “He’s evil Bo. Pure and ugly evil. Looks like he’s already started. Who is it? The Valkyrie? The wolf? Oh… right… the doctor.” Bo tells Zee: “I will never let my father get between me and Lauren.” Zee then seems to suffer some kind of attack, becoming unsteady on her feet. Zee tells Bo: “The doctor is much too weak to hold out much longer. Functioning as a full-time Conduit comes with full-time side effects. I can feel her cells breaking down.” Bo cries out that Zee is killing Lauren but Zee insists: “It’s not my intention to hurt her. You just need to listen, Hera.” Bo assumes that Zee is losing her mind but then Lauren seems to come into control for a moment, asking Bo where she is, before collapsing into Bo’s arms. Elsewhere Tamsin and Elizabeth are listening to what is happening and Tamsin moves to help Bo, Elizabeth asking how she can help, but Tamsin does not answer as she leaves. Back at the forge, Bo attempts to leave with Zee, but is stopped by Zee who tells Bo they must wait as: “Hepha created my shield and now he’s using it to forge a weapon for you.” When Bo turns once more to leave, she finds Hera who enters and blocks their way, commenting: “Oh good, the gang’s all here.” Bo tells Hera that Lauren is dying and they need to leave, but Hera replies: “Oh that’s a pity. She took such good care of me, saved my life. Why was that? Because Zeus killed me!” Zee sighs: “You’re not still upset about that are you?” As Hera moves towards Bo, Tamsin enters with Elizabeth following close behind her. Tamsin tells Bo that Lauren is too weak and offers herself to Zee, but Elizabeth rushes around the group, taking hold of Lauren’s arm and then Zeus leaves Lauren’s body and enters Elizabeth’s once more. Bo then hands Lauren off to Tamsin, telling her to get Lauren away, which Tamsin does, neither Zee or Hera stopping her. Hera then demands that Zee admit that she needs him. Zee replies: “How can you be so stupid? Of course I need you.” The two then kiss as Bo asks Hepha how long it will be until the weapon is ready, Hera telling Bo: “Not in this lifetime succubus.” Hera then wonders what Zee’s plan was and then says: “Plan: ‘Now we kill Bo.”

Following still another commercial break, Bo asks: “I thought we were on the same team here? Hades, bad. Us, good?” Hera tells Bo: “Zee doesn’t need another sidekick. I’m her second in command. And now? You’re fired.” Bo replies as Hera approaches: “I believe that’s my line” and then picks up a red hot poker and points it towards Hera. He takes hold of the poker by the red hot end and begins to push it towards Bo. As this happens, Zee has moved towards the hatch in the floor and begins to open it which diverts Hera’s attention to her, telling Zee to stop what she is doing. Hera begs Zee not to send him back to Myth, telling Zee about how bored they were there. Zee replies: “This isn’t the end love. You trust me don’t you?” Zee offers her hand which Hera takes, telling Zee: “I do.” The pair then take hold of the wheel and are about to turn it, but Bo calls out: “So that’s it? No goodbye cat fight?” Zee walks over to Bo and tells her: “I’m so glad we got to know each other. My beautiful niece. You know I defended people once. And in return they worshipped me. They had sacrifices for me.” Bo comments: “Sounds like you had it all.” Zee tells Bo: “I let it go to my head Don’t let it go to yours. Remember with great power comes great…” Bo interrupts: “Okay, Voltaire.” Zee then hugs Bo and whispers to her: “Never forget. Hades’ evil comes in many forms.” Zee then returns to Hera, the two open the hatch and then a moment later, they leave their human hosts, entering the opening and defending to Myth, the hatch closing behind them and their human hosts falling to the floor, Hera unconscious, Elizabeth groggy, but awake. There is the sound of something metallic falling to the floor and Bo looks to find what appears to be a horseshoe laying on the floor nearby. Bo calls out Hepha’s name, but he does not answer. Bo then walks over to the horseshoe and picks it up. As she looks at it, Bo wonders: “What the Hepha am I supposed to do with this?”

Elsewhere, Dyson and Alycia are seen in bed together, Alycia commenting: “Why didn’t anyone tell me about Fae in college?” Dyson’s phone then rings and after a short conversation with Bo about what has happened, he turns to Alycia, a troubled expression on his face. Alycia tells him: “I don’t like that look.” Dyson replies: “It’s Kevin.”

The scene then moves to Dyson leading Alycia into Lauren’s clinic, a nurse standing over what appears to be Kevin in bed. Dyson tells Alycia: “You don’t owe me anything. I want you to live your life the way it was.” Alycia replies that she doesn’t regret anything as it is revealed that Kevin is awake and Alycia runs to be with him, Dyson looking on for a moment before turning away and leaving.

Elsewhere at Bo’s home, Bo is setting out some takeout as Lauren enters the room. Bo tells Lauren: “I got us pho. To help you pho-get about spending an entire day inside that psychopath’s head.” Bo apologizes for her joke when Lauren doesn’t react to it. Bo then tells Lauren that she loves her and explains that: “If you want to be Fae, then that’s what I want too.” Lauren replies: “I took the antidote. I’m not Fae anymore.” Bo is surprised by this, but tells Lauren: “I’m just glad you are okay. Are you okay?” Lauren begins to cry as she explains: “I lost myself. I was so completely obsessed with us, that I lost myself.” Bo tries to comfort Lauren, telling Lauren that she is “healthy and things can be the way they were” but Lauren continues: “You asked me why I was so willing to give up who I am to be Fae. It was never about being Fae, it was about us. It was about fixing the one thing that holds us back.” Bo tells Lauren: “We don’t need to be fixed, we’re perfect.” Lauren sighs: “When I am old and grey and losing my mind for real…” Bo again tries to tell Lauren that: “I will still love you. You. Lauren Lewis. No matter how many grey hairs you have on your head.” Lauren whispers: “I know you will Bo. That’s just it, I know you will love me until my last dying breath. But I can’t do that to you. I don’t want to do that to you.” Bo tells Lauren it is her decision to do so, but Lauren insists that it isn’t her decision alone. Bo tells Lauren that how she is feeling is because of Hades interfering in their lives, but Lauren replies: “No, it’s not because of him. This is about you and me. I’m supposed to be a healer and you’re a protector. I risked all of that.” Bo is silent, then tells Lauren: “All. I want. Is you.” Lauren tells Bo that she “can’t” and that “People need you, people need me.” Bo begs Lauren not to sever their relationship again, but Lauren continues: “Believe me I know. I’m so sorry. I love you.” before she kisses Bo and then Lauren leaves the room, Bo remaining there, saying nothing as Lauren leaves.

Bo is then seen sweeping the playing pieces off a chessboard in anger as she then tells Hades: “Let me get something straight, in case it is not abundantly clear. You and me? Never going to happen.” Hades is nonplussed as he replies: “You found Zee. How is the old girl?” Bo continues: “This is all a game to you, isn’t it? You set up the chess pieces and you sit back and watch them fall. Whatever you are planning? Go. Do it. I’m done waiting. It’s your move.” Hades calmly asks: “Lauren reversed the serum.” Bo tells Hades: “Not before it nearly killed her. Bravo! Your master plan worked! Lauren and I are done.” When Hades attempts to explain, Bo warns him: “Do not Bo me. This is what you wanted.” Hades insists that what has transpired is not what he wanted, adding: “I want my daughter to be happy.” Bo cannot believe him, replying: “Hades wants me to be happy?” Hades continues: “People like us, we are capable of many things. But Love?” Hades says nothing more but shakes his head. Bo cries: “She’s gone Dad. We’re over.” Hades then embraces Bo, whispering: “Oh baby… I didn’t come here to ruin your life. I think I should take a step back now. Let you sort things out. But I’ll be here. I’ll be right here if you decide you need me.” Bo replies: “Great, everyone’s breaking up with me today.” Hades tells Bo: “Gods no. You haven’t heard a word I’ve said. Without family we are nothing. But I can only lead you to water, I cannot force you to drink.” Bo sighs: “We’re back to the horse metaphors. You’re right. You can’t force me to drink, and I never will.” as she then walks away from Hades.

After the final commercial break, the scene then moves to the Dal Riata where Trick tells Bo and Dyson that the horseshoe is made of Adamantine and pure gold. Bo tells Trick: “A horseshoe is not a weapon. It’s a parlour game.” Trick explains: “In lore, the horseshoe symbolizes protection, wards off evil, and brings good luck.” Bo sighs: “I’m not feeling especially lucky right now.” Trick tells Bo that he will keep searching for more information and then hands the horseshoe back to Bo. Bo comments to Dyson after Trick leaves: “All of that for a gods damn horseshoe.” Bo muses: “Maybe Jack’s right. Maybe I’m not made for love.” Dyson tells Bo: “I think the opposite is true. But if there’s one thing I have learned from loving you, better to have loved and lost.” Bo asks: “You cared for Alycia.” Dyson pauses a moment, then answers: “I didn’t think I could.” Bo smiles, takes one of Dyson’s hands in hers, tapping them on the horseshoe and they look at each other as the scene comes to a close.

The final scene of the episode begins with Bo at home watching television as Tamsin enters and tells Bo: “We have to do something about this wallow. It’s all wrong.” Bo replies: “You are critiquing my wallow?” Tamsin explains: “Wallow requirement numbero uno: snacks.” Tamsin offers to order pizza but this only makes Bo start to cry. Tamsin then suggests Sushi or something else, like Chinese, instead after seeing Bo’s reaction. Bo tells Tamsin: “She’s gone Tamsin. We’re over.” Tamsin replies: “You do whatever you need to do. Cry, scream or whatever feels right.” Bo stares at Tamsin a moment, then moves towards her, kissing Tamsin. After the kiss ends, Tamsin whispers: “Or that works too. But, maybe not with me?” Bo is silent for a moment, then tells Tamsin: “No matter how much I try, someone always ends up hurt.” Tamsin replies: “It’s just we’re friends without benefits remember?” Bo smiles sadly, nods and then apologizes to Tamsin before telling Tamsin she is going to bed and starting to leave the room.

Tamsin then calls out for Bo to stop and then walks up to her saying to herself: “I’m going to regret this later.” Bo then stalks up to Tamsin, the two kissing again before Bo tears Tamsin’s shirt and then presses her against a wall before kissing her again. The final image of the episode is a closeup of Bo as she kisses Tamsin fiercely, Bo’s hair around her temples turning white, her features changing to be similar to Hades as the episode ends.


Fade to black…


After the promise of last week’s episode I found this week’s very hard to keep focused on. There was too many side stories that lasted for a short time before the episode moved on and it started to come apart at the edges. There seemed to be too many things going on, too many plots and characters needing to be closed and trying to do that all in one episode I think was a huge mistake.

As it was, because there was so much going on, what should have been something more tangible for the ending of the Zee and Hera arcs became almost laughable in its tone. There was all kinds of build up focusing on Zee and instead of amounting to something good, it turned into a wasted plot, character, and purpose. So Zee and Hera run off to leave Bo to deal with her father. That’s a really thin use of what was seemingly two characters that could, barely, keep up with Bo. So much time spent in developing the story arc, making them a real threat, almost ending the world mind you, and the net result is a hug and a short good luck speech.

Connected to that comes a question that wasn’t explained. Bo needed to pass a test to see Hepha. So how is it that Tamsin and Elizabeth just managed to walk right in? I’d love an explanation of how that worked exactly as it makes not a whit of sense.

Then comes the “weapon” that Bo is supposed to use against Hades. A horseshoe. We’ve had all kinds of horse imagery and so forth, but there hasn’t been a payoff for any of it. If the result of Bo’s horseshoe is that she smacks him in the head with it, that will just be perfect considering all of the silly directions this episode went in.

There was a lot of time wasted with the courtroom scene, and in that came an “answer” about Bo that doesn’t fit, feels wrong, and makes little sense. It would have been far more interesting, at least to me. to have Bo made to be in the witness box, facing, for example, her mother, the Ash, even the Garuda, to defend her actions as being just and right. That would have made more sense, been more interesting, and provided more to tell about Bo than what turns out to be a nonsensical explanation of what Bo’s “inner justice” is.

Much can be said about Lauren as well in this episode. There’s no really good explanation of why  she broke up with Bo, other than “I have to” which is not a reason at all. Moreover, the way they ended the relationship really didn’t end it, there will be a return to it most likely, so why bother with this in the first place? Wouldn’t it have been more interesting for Lauren to decide that, like Dyson, to love is more important than never to have? Lauren seems to have the opinion that love doesn’t matter as much as what she, and by extension, Bo, do in their lives. That doesn’t fit with their relationship well.

Hades remains as scheming and unhelpful as ever, and the question becomes why Bo can’t see it, deal with it, and comes to needing a hug from him when she knows, at least deep inside, that he seems to be the source of all of her problems. It might make for some good television, but otherwise it makes little sense. There’s a point to making Hades unlikeable of course, but there also comes a point when one wonders where the limits are and if they have been well overcome by the plots that keep building up around him.

The Dyson/Alycia plot is another example of something unfolding that seemed to have a point, but just when things were turning interesting, and there seemed like there might be a real conflict to come, that plot got the rug pulled out from under it. Why go through so many episodes of building up Alycia to just end things with the return of her husband in a sort of “Bobby in the shower” moment? Past that, she knows all about the Fae, so does her husband. What happens next? I’m not expecting to see that as they are seemingly written out of the series now, but it’s a question that bothers me.

Which then brings me to the end of this episode. It’s a little off-putting, but it might explain what Hades is doing when he’s not in his cell. I wonder how many events have been going on in the past with him impersonating someone else. At least that’s how I see things. It would be worse if Bo is turning into him, and I hope that’s not happening.

The majority of this episode felt like it was wasting time so that the horseshoe could be made. It served as the focal point to just about everything that happened really. The other thing that really got to me was Elizabeth. When she returned I couldn’t stand her character, her speech and most of all, that incessant rambling of hers. It just took apart things and made what should have been more seriously taken a joke. It didn’t work.

I’m not sure this is the weakest episode of the season, but it certainly was one of the hardest to keep interested in. That shouldn’t have been, not this deep into the season and so close to the end. I expected better. I didn’t find it.

On to the characters in the episode…

Bo… Lawyer Bo looked nice at least. The rest of the time she was moving from crying to ranting and back again and that bothered me. She knows full well that Hades is pulling the strings. Bo is better than what she showed in this episode and needs to be more going forwards. But now she’s emotionally crippled it seems and it shouldn’t be.

Dyson…Playing house, then playing around, and not really doing a lot else. Not really character development as tying up a loose end.

Lauren. Loosing her mind, her love, and her life. Not necessarily in that order. An episode wasted for the sake of ending a plot poorly and a relationship even more so.

Tamsin: There, sort of. Some cute jokes, a bit of dealing with tears and trying to find her own way with Bo. It could have been better done, but it came as it was.

Trick. Needs more Trick. Again. Books are nice, but Trick being core to the episode he’s in is better.

Hades. Too much “I know” in his attitude. There’s a real lack of empathy in his character and the words spoken just don’t have the feeling they should have. Plans within plans is his motto and he’s living up to that.

Zee/Elizabeth. Couldn’t like Elizabeth, just a really poor character in her form, voice and mannerisms. Zee got flushed and as such what should have been something for the end of the series turned into a footnote. Sad considering all of the investment in time in her character till now.

Hera/Kevin. Psycho-nutty with a side order of weirdness. Again, Hera was a threat, seen to be so, and in the end shuffled off this mortal coil. Kevin was an afterthought and a single sentence just to bring Alycia’s arc to a close.

Megaera. Possibly the most interesting character of the episode. She had presence, drive, attitude and there was meaning in her words. It would have been interesting to see her grill Bo about her life, but instead, when it came to the moment that mattered, she was directing traffic. Shame honestly.

Hepha. Could have been something, but didn’t go anywhere and needed to. There’s a story in him, but all he really did was bang away and look ashamed. That’s not a good use of a character.

Of the rest of the minor characters, really the one that I would have liked to have a name, and to know more about, was the nurse in Lauren’s clinic. She had lines, she had been around for some time in the series, so why not give her a name. Flo would have been cute. As for the rest, they didn’t really stick with me by the end of the episode and I think that mainly was to just the story itself. There was no need to care, and I didn’t.

That speaks to the entire episode. I should have cared. But I didn’t.


My Review of Judgement Fae

Keeping my interest – 2 Pitchforks

Portrayal of a Succubus – 1 Pitchforks

Overall look and feel – 4 Pitchforks

Storyline – 4 Pitchforks

Main Characters – 4 Pitchforks

Mythos – 5 Pitchforks

Overall Rating – 3.3 Pitchforks out of 5


It was incredibly difficult for me to stay interested in this episode. It was scattered, uneven, didn’t have much of a focus and it needed one. There was too many short moments that appeared for the sake of closing a plot that felt like, in many ways, a cheat to what had come before. Ending long plot lines with a short moment in which nothing is said of substance, and little is left to matter, doesn’t make things better. In the entire episode there were two moments that brought me back fully. I should have been more invested in the episode and I wasn’t.

Very little succubus in this episode, of course, and what there was came from Lauren. Even at the end when Bo, if it was Bo, started to become intimate with Tamsin that wasn’t her being a succubus. It didn’t have the feel of one nor the appearance. Bo the Succubus is more and more an afterthought and being so the core plot in Bo’s character becomes lesser for it.

I thought the courtroom was nice, and to be honest, I know the building that was shot in. I think I even know the hallway as well. The forge was well done, though there was so much smoke that a lot of the details where barely seen. Seeing Bo and Tamsin all “legal” was neat and I liked that a a lot. Where Elizabeth was seemed odd, but I suppose that hiding away somewhere need not be explained.

There is a storyline, it’s buried among a lot of plot threads being closed and it does have a point. It leads into that horseshoe and points the arc towards the finale, in a way. The minor plot of the courtroom, or the Alycia/Dyson plot or even, to an extent, the Lauren leaving Bo plot, does as well, but it takes a lot of time to get through, needing to pass through a lot of empty scenes before the storylines get into gear and go somewhere and do something. Still, there is something to move forwards on, it is important and the threads in this episode do have a lasting effect.

Overall, there was some good character development and in that came some closure, some changes and in the case of Bo and Lauren, a turning point in their relationship. As well, to have Dyson see, if only fleetingly, that he could have other loves made a difference to his character and that matters considering how twisted up he has been for so long in the series. There was much less in the case of Tamsin, and nothing for Trick, and I wish there would be more of Trick than there has been for some time now in the series. With luck, an upcoming episode’s title suggests that he will have a larger role.

The mythos of the series took another leap, and that enriched things a lot. The series has always used the myths of many societies and cultures and at some point Olympus would have to appear. There’s some interesting changes and turns added, but as well there is a unique flavour to the story and mythos of the series as this happens and I think that, more than anything else, made this more than it otherwise would have been.

This should have meant more. Needed to. I hope that in some way it will when things come to a head which will be sooner rather than later.


Next Week: Family Portrait

When conflicting versions of her past emerge, Bo searches for the truth.


As I recall things in the series, Hades told a different version of Bo’s past several episodes ago. So why, exactly, did it take this long for Bo to decide that it might be a good idea to go and ask questions about her life?

The only upshot of this that I can see is that, maybe, we’ll see Aife appear and Bo’s parents will have a face-off against each other. That in itself I think would be interesting, but I really don’t expect it to happen. It would be too obvious a means to get to the truth about things, for one, but more so, not having Aife appearing means that Bo will have to go off and find the truth for herself, assuming she can do so.

I see a lot of visits to Tartarus next episode, which of course means we’ll have a large number of one-off characters appearing to reveal a small point and move on. Still, I think it could be interesting if here is some truth to the entire episode, but at the same time I am concerned about losing an episode to what otherwise might be just some window dressing for the overall season arc, if that.

What makes this more questionable is simply having to deal with Hades and all of the lies and truths that are wrapped up in one another and what one can believe and what one cannot. More so, why is it that Bo would even trust her father after all of the evidence that says she shouldn’t be? There’s a point at which “doing the dumb thing” for plot can’t be overlooked and that is the point where things become a real problem for me.

I’m still miffed at Bo’s “inner justice” because it isn’t. It wasn’t a statement of what she believes in, what her goals are, not even what she holds when everything is coming apart at the seams around her. So I’m not expecting that Bo’s “real” past is going to come out either. I’m not sure as well that knowing her actual past really makes all that much of a difference for Bo as a character in the first place. Adding flavour to her makes some sense, and that’s fine, but if the episode wastes a lot of time having Bo riding elevators and talking to herself I won’t be at all pleased.

If nothing else, and, again, I’m not expecting it to happen, I would like to see some closure to the Aife arc so that part of Bo’s life can be put to rest. Thinking about this, Bo’s human life was closed in what was a good episode that told of her human parents and what happened between them. I would like to see something with at least as much drama and character development. Putting closure to the question of who Bo really is would be something positive. But this isn’t the last episode and so that’s highly unlikely.

It seems like these last episodes are adding more complexities, more stories, more issues for all involved and with so few left it doesn’t make a lot of sense to pile on a lot of extra threads, no matter how interesting they might be. There’s a core story, that being of Bo, who she is, and her dealing with being a Succubus. It’s been a long time since we’ve seen that in the series and it really is time to get back to that arc again.

I still have a fear of the series winding up exactly where it started and if it does, that’s the bigger shame of all. Circular stories have their place and all, but after all that has happened does that really make for closure in a series that needs some? I think it isn’t and I hope it isn’t.

Still, the question of family is one that keeps coming up over and over again in the series, but really never gets settled, explained, or dealt with. I don’t think I can be too optimistic in believing that the next episode will be anything else than what has happened before, but one never knows.

Perhaps wading through the popcorn around my television will be worth it?